South Sea Pearls — indonesia

What do you know about Keshi Pearls?

Posted by Francisco Javier Fernandez Sanchez on

Keshi (ケシ), meaning poppy seed in Japanese, was originally used in Japan for very small-sized natural pearls, namely the very rare Akoya natural pearls that were locally collected until the early 20th century. Today, however, the original meaning of the word "keshi" became corrupted and is now a trade name for the nacreous non-bead saltwater cultured pearls that form, by accident or intentionally, inside pearl producing molluscs as a by-product of the classic seeding or grafting process. The first reported cultured keshi pearls in the early-20th century were associated to the then emerging Akoya cultured pearl farming in Japan and...

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Mother-of-pearl

Posted by Francisco Javier Fernandez Sanchez on

Mother-of-pearl has been used since pre-historic times for adornment. In the modern ages, it was also artistically used in marquetry, gaming chips, devotional artefacts, as a bead for the cultured pearl industry but also in the button industry, being rather popular before plastics came into action. Mother-of-pearl is the smooth nacreous iridescent coating on the interior of some molluscs and Pinctada maxima, the Australian South Sea pearl oyster (also known as pearl button oyster and mother-of-pearl oyster) has been a rather important source not only for the quality of the nacre but also because the wild shells have notorious sizes...

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What do you know about Pearls history?

Posted by Francisco Javier Fernandez Sanchez on

During Christopher Columbus’s third (1498) and fourth (1502) voyages to the New World, he repeatedly encountered native people adorned with natural pearls. 

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The Pearl Journey

Posted by Francisco Javier Fernandez Sanchez on

Few people outside the gem industry realize the true nature of a cultured pearl’s journey.

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Do you know F.A.Q to buy South Sea Pearls from our Website?

Posted by Francisco Javier Fernandez Sanchez on

F.A.Q  from www.southseapearls.net

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